Sometimes it's easier to give up rather than keep trying to get an 'A' in Math, or fix your marriage, or learn how to ride a bike, or get along with your spouse, or get through to your children. Of course there are times when plain old common sense will tell you that it's time to quit that job, or that project, or that friendship. But for the other times we can all learn from those who did not give up:
 
Thomas Edison's teachers said he was "too stupid to learn anything." He was fired from his first two jobs for being "non-productive." As an inventor, Edison made 1,000 unsuccessful attempts at inventing the light bulb. When a reporter asked, "How did it feel to fail 1,000 times?" Edison replied, "I didn't fail 1,000 times. The light bulb was an invention with 1,000 steps."
 
After his first audition, Sidney Poitier was told by the casting director, "Why don't you stop wasting people's time and go out and become a dishwasher or something?" It was at that moment that he decided to devote his life to acting.
 
Albert Einstein did not speak until he was 4-years-old and did not read until he was 7. His parents thought he was "sub-normal," and one of his teachers described him as "mentally slow, unsociable, and adrift forever in foolish dreams." He was expelled from school and was refused admittance to the Zurich Polytechnic School. He did eventually learn to speak and read. Even to do a little math. 
 
Beethoven handled the violin awkwardly and preferred playing his own compositions instead of improving his technique. His teacher called him "hopeless as a composer." And, of course, you know that he wrote five of his greatest symphonies while completely deaf.
           
Van Gogh sold only one painting during his life, and this to the sister of one of his friends for 400 francs (approximately $50). This didn't stop him from completing over 800 paintings.
 
If you give up, you have no chance of succeeding. 

Yours,

Didi Ji