We humans would do well to look towards the animal kingdom and learn how to better manage many aspects of living; one of which is eating and accumulating only as much as we need. Hibernators such as squirrels gather nuts for the winter, but only as many as necessary. Their accumulation is based on need, not greed. Looking at these and other creatures we learn to eat only as much as it is necessary to fill the stomach. While these creatures eat to live, we often live to eat.

Many people accumulate so much that they become hoarders. Some extreme hoarders become prisoners in their own homes, always bringing more possessions into their living space and not being able to discard even outdated material and expired food items.

A good plan of action to avoid this extreme is to get into the habit of giving away or discarding certain possessions. If it is useable, act with compassion by donating it to the needy. If it’s broken and unfixable, discard it lovingly.

The underlying problem for hoarders may be anxiety, schizophrenia, or a deprived childhood. Hoarders generally accumulate many emotions that go unchecked. They form an emotional bond with objects and are therefore unable to discard them.

If you are or becoming such person, take a photo of the possessions to which you are attached but do not need. You can then look at the photos whenever you want. As for possessions, make a concentrated effort to use what you have. If you have not used it for a year, you do not need it. Before making a new purchase, ask yourself, “Am I acting out of need or out of greed?”


Yours,
?
Didi Ji

Yours,

Didi Ji